June 2, 2010

 

Hong Kong cancels poultry slaughtering centre development
 

 

Hong Kong government announced today, June 1, that it would defer the development of a poultry slaughtering centre (PSC) at its current stage due to excellent biosecurity measures.

 

At a press conference held today, Food and Health Secretary Dr York Chow said: "The government has made this decision mainly because our latest scientific assessment confirmed that the risk of avian influenza in Hong Kong at present is very low. This is the outcome of the biosecurity measures and preventive and control measures against avian influenza implemented at the poultry farm, wholesale, retail and import levels over the years. There is therefore at present no need to develop a PSC in Hong Kong."

 

Earlier on, the government conducted a scientific assessment to evaluate the risk of human infection by avian influenza viruses associated with the live poultry trade in Hong Kong, and consulted the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases on the results of the assessment. The committee, chaired by Professor Yuen Kwok-yung and comprising doctors, veterinarians, microbiologists and other experts, agreed that the risk of avian influenza to Hong Kong had been significantly reduced in recent years and confirmed the efficacy of the control and surveillance measures at all levels.

 

Furthermore, according to the on-going surveillance conducted in retail outlets by the University of Hong Kong, the isolation rate of H9N2 viruses, which is a good indicator of the loading of avian influenza virus in the poultry population, has significantly dropped from 5.11% before the ban on the keeping of live poultry overnight in retail markets and introduction of the buyout scheme for the live poultry trade in 2008 to 0.09% recently. This shows that the risk of avian influenza at the retail level has been successfully controlled at an extremely low level.

 

Since Hong Kong became the first place in the world to have identified human infection by avian influenza in 1997, a number of preventive and control measures have been implemented at various levels of the live poultry supply chain, including local poultry farms, the wholesale market, retail outlets and at the import level, to control the risk of avian influenza.

 

Live chicken consumption in Hong Kong has declined from a daily average of 92,000 chickens in 2003 to only 16,500 in 2009. The reduction in the number of retail outlets, wholesalers and poultry farms and in rearing capacity has greatly contributed to containing the chicken population and chicken supply in Hong Kong at a steady level, thus minimising the chance of human contact with live chickens.