April 20, 2015
 
Reoccurrences of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus detected in the US (Global Animal Disease Update) (week ended Apr 17, 2015)
 
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Reoccurrences of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus were detected in the United States this week. The following report contains an overview of the overall disease situation.
 

ASIA

1.  Reoccurrence of classical swine fever virus detected in Mongolia

Reoccurrence of classical swine fever virus was detected in Mongolia, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) reports.

The information was received by the OIE on April 10 from Dr. Bolortuya Purevsuren, OIE delegate, Veterinary and Animal Breeding Agency, Ministry for Industry and Agriculture, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

The outbreak was reported to be on March 31, 2015 at a pig farm in 13 khoroo 4 heseg, Khan-uul, TUV. 53 cases were identified in swine, resulting in 691 swine becoming susceptible. All infected swine died and 638 swine were destroyed. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included quarantine and disinfection of infected premises. No vaccination or treatment were given to the affected animals.
 
2.  Reoccurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus detected in Chinese Taipei

Reoccurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, serotype H5N2, was detected in Chinese Taipei, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on April 14 from Dr. Ping-Cheng Yang, Vice President, Agriculture Technology Research Institute, Council of Agriculture, Hsinchu City, Chinese Taipei.

The outbreak was reported to be on January 7, 2015 at Yunlin county. 4,612 cases were identified in birds, resulting in 5,500 birds becoming susceptible. All infected birds died and 888 birds were destroyed. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening, zoning and disinfection of infected premises. Vaccination is prohibited and no treatment was given to the affected animals.
 

EUROPE

3.  First occurrence of African swine fever virus detected in Latvia

A first occurrence of African swine fever virus was detected in Latvia, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on April 13 from Dr. Maris Balodis, Chief Veterinary Officer & Director General, Food and Veterinary Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Riga, Latvia.

The outbreak event was reported to have started on June 25, 2014 at Burtnieki, Koceni, Valkas, Limbazi and Daugavpils counties. Nine cases were identified in wild boar, resulting in seven infected wild boar dying. The other infected wild boars were destroyed. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included control of wildlife reservoirs, quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening, zoning and disinfection of infected premises. No vaccination and treatment were given to the affected animals.

4.  First occurrence of African swine fever virus detected in Estonia

A first occurrence of African swine fever virus was detected in Estonia, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on April 13 from Mr. Ago Pärtel, Director General, Veterinary and Food Board, Veterinary and Food Board, Tallinn, Estonia.

The outbreak event was reported to have started on September 2, 2014 at Valga and Viljandi. Three cases were identified in wild boar, killing all infected wild boars. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included control of wildlife reservoirs, screening and zoning. No vaccination and treatment were given to the affected animals.
 

AMERICAS

5.  Reoccurrences of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus detected in the US

Reoccurrences of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, serotype H5N2, were detected in the United States, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on April 15 from Dr. John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington.

11 outbreaks were reported across northern US states, resulting in 978,379 birds becoming susceptible. 280,939 were destroyed. The source of the outbreaks was reported to be contact with wild species.

Control measures, among others, included quarantine, movement control inside the country, zoning and disinfection of infected premises. Vaccination is prohibited and no treatment was given to the affected animals.
 


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