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December 1, 2011
 
Thai Feed Weekly:  Damaged rice salvaged from floods turned into feeds (week ended Nov 28)
 
An eFeedLink Exclusive
 
 
Price Summary
 
Prices of broken rice and other rice byproducts have slid as Thailand faces the prospect of an oversupply of these commodities as farmers started to salvage rice crops damaged by the severe flooding in central Thailand recently.
 
But those of other feed raw materials, such as corn, soymeal, fishmeal and cassava, were unchanged, according to price surveys by CP and the Office of Agricultural Economics (OAE).
 
Broken rice, a major component in Thai feed formulation, currently trades at US$556 a tonne, down from US$563/tonne last week. Prices of rice bran and bran extracts, which are also used in Thai feeds, dropped by about 10% since last week.
 
 
Market analysis
 
A joint United Nations and OAE inspections team visited the provinces of Lopburi and Nakhon Sawan this week at the start of a comprehensive survey involving 30 provinces to assess the damage to the country's agriculture in the aftermath of the recent flooding.
 
Apichart Jongskul, secretary-general of the OAE, says their initial findings show 100% of the rice crops in the two provinces were damaged by the flood. But tonnes of unharvested rice, soaked during the flooding, are being salvaged by farmers and dried for milling into broken rice for use as livestock feeds.

Rice millers are buying the damaged rice at a very low price of THB2000-3000 a tonne, Apichart says, while the prevailing price of good paddy rice is THB15,000-15,600 a tonne.
 
He adds that the inspection team expects the same situation in the many other rice-producing provinces in the country inundated by Thailand's worst flooding in six decades.
  
The Thai feed industry uses up to a million tonnes of broken rice a year. However, due to an anticipated oversupply, the industry is likely to increase use of rice in local feed formulations as substitute for corn and cassava, which are in tight supply.
 
Thousands of acres of corn and cassava plantations are estimated to have been damaged by the widespread inundation.
 
Apichart says the team visiting Lopburi and Nakhon Sawan provinces saw tonnes of unharvested cassava roots, which were underwater for at least ten days, were seen rotting in farms.
 

 

PRICE as of  Nov 21
(in Thai baht/kg)

PRICE as of  Nov 28
(in Thai baht/kg)

Changes
(in Thai baht/kg)

Corn (Delivered to feed factory)

9.90-10.10

9.90-10.10

--

Cassava

2.45-3.00

2.45-3.00

--

White Broken Rice A.1 Super (US$/tonne)

563.00

556.00

-7.00

White rice bran

10.80-11.00

9.80-10.00

-1.00

Rice bran residue 

9.20-9.50

8.40-8.50

 -(0.80-1.00)

Soy

11.60-14.45

11.60-14.45

--

Soymeal (imported)

15.50

15.50

--

Soymeal (local)

15.05-15.30

15.05-15.30

--

Fishmeal (shrimp grade)

25.00-37.98

25.00-37.98

--

US$1=THB 30.95 (Dec 1, 2011)

 

 


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