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November 10, 2008

 

ASA weekly: USDA develops drought-resistant soybean

 
 

A team led by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant geneticist Thomas Carter will soon release advanced soy breeding lines that carry slow-wilting traits. These lines perform well under drought conditions, and also show good yield potential when rainfall is plentiful. Private seed companies and public soy breeders can use the drought-tolerant lines as breeding stock to develop high-yielding varieties adapted to stressful US weather conditions, especially during summers.

 

Carter is with the ARS Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research Unit in Raleigh, N.C. "Team Drought" is a group of researchers at five universities, which Carter heads. They aim to develop drought-tolerant breeding lines across a range of maturity groups for adaptation to every soy-growing area of the country.

 

The slow-wilting lines yield 4 to 8 bushels more than conventional varieties under drought conditions - depending on the region and environment. For example, where normal soy would yield 30 bushels per acre under drought conditions, the slow-wilting types can surpass those yields by about 5 bushels per acre.

 

Under drought conditions, the typical American soy crop can drop to a fraction of its yield potential. Adding genetic diversity to the US soy industry will help protect the food supply from vulnerabilities.

 

For more than 25 years, Carter has been working on transferring slow-wilting characteristics from Asian landraces, which are foreign introductions, into US adapted varieties. As the team gets the slow-wilting trait into high-yielding lines, they share those new lines with industry breeders.

 

Soy-based products a threat to global dairy industry

 

Soy-based products will represent a serious competitive threat to milk as a protein substitute in the years to come unless the dairy industry can innovate to increase the value of its product. This was the warning issued last week by John Penno, managing director and chief executive officer of New Zealand's Synlait group.

 

Soy can be produced much more efficiently on scales that cannot even be comprehended and as soy products are being developed toresemble dairy products, there is a danger that it can become a substitute for most dairy products, said  Penno.

 

Penno believes the global dairy industry faces a challenge to keep up with value added soy products. There will be a tough competition against an easy and cheaper production, soy, said Penno.

 

IEA expects increase in use of biodiesel

 

The International Energy Agency (IEA) forecasts that biofuels will comprise 12 percent of global liquid fuel supplies by 2030, rising to 26 percent by 2050, representing a 20-fold increase of the actual figure in 2007. Cicilia Tam, an energy analyst with the IEA, told delegates at the FO Licht World Ethanol conference that from 2025, the biofuels balance would increasingly shift from first-generation ethanol towards second-generation fuels and biofuels.

 

Tam explained that in the IEA projection, called 'Energy Technology Perspectives', aircraft, shipping and heavy lorries would increasingly use more advanced biofuels by 2030, and this would particularly benefit soy-based biodiesel. Both aircraft and shipping are expected to have a 30 percent biofuel share in terms of total fuel use in 2030, compared with zero at present. Several airlines are now conducting test flights with biofuel mixes.

 

In terms of land use, IEA has issued a conservative prediction that 160 million hectares of land will be used for energy crops by 2050, representing just 3 percent of the global agricultural area.

 

The IEA has also issued a short-term forecast for world biodiesel production, which is still expected to see strong growth, rising from 1.35 million barrels a day in 2008 to almost 2 million barrels a day in 2013.

 

India says it will not impose import duties on edible oils for the time being

 

India has decided not to impose any tax on the import of crude edible oils for the time being, despite claims by industry officials that lower international prices are affecting domestic producers.

 

Kamal Nath, the minister for commerce and industry, told reporters last week that the government would not re-introduce the duty on imports after a meeting with Farm Minister Sharad Pawar, Finance Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram and other policy makers. The decision came as a surprise to many industry officials and analysts as Pawar hinted late last month that he expected the taxation on imports to be reintroduced.

 

B.V. Mehta, chief executive of the Solvent Extractors' Association of India, has also been pressing the government for a change in its policy. Mehta believes the government needs to keep working on pending issues like higher duties on vegetable oil imports and allowing exports.
 
U.S. & South America Soybean/Products Balance
 
United States 
Argentina
Brazil
Actual
Estimate
Proj.
Actual
Estimate
Proj.
Actual
Estimate
Proj.
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
Soybeans
thousand tonnes
 Carryin
12,229
15,617
3,811
334
1,876
680
2,252
3,110
3,235
 Production
86,770
70,358
79,848
48,800
46,500
50,500
59,000
61,000
62,500
 Imports
246
272
272
2,336
3,325
3,450
108
150
160
 Crush
49,198
49,396
48,580
35,962
36,400
37,890
31,511
32,400
32,500
 Exports
30,428
31,434
27,216
12,132
13,100
14,100
23,805
25,650
27,500
 Other
4,002
1,606
4,469
1,500
1,521
1,550
2,934
2,975
3,025
 Usage
83,628
82,436
80,265
49,594
51,021
53,540
58,250
61,025
63,025
   Carryout
15,617
3,811
3,666
1,876
680
1,090
3,110
3,235
2,870
Soymeal
thousand tonnes
 Carryin
285
314
272
2,003
1,144
1,610
863
1,563
2,263
 Production
39,058
39,022
38,469
27,856
28,621
29,745
24,420
25,130
25,190
 Domestic use
31,184
30,618
30,844
617
640
696
11,520
12,155
12,550
 Net Exports
7,845
8,446
7,652
28,098
27,515
29,000
12,200
12,275
12,970
 Usage
39,029
39,064
38,496
28,715
28,155
29,696
23,720
24,430
25,520
   Carryout
314
272
245
1,144
1,610
1,659
1,563
2,263
1,933
Soybean oil
thousand tonnes
 Carryin
1,365
1,399
1,195
487
310
331
300
341
336
 Production
9,294
9,498
9,231
6,917
6,958
7,245
6,050
6,220
6,240
 Domestic use
8,420
8,368
8,324
580
995
1,170
3,550
3,895
4,048
 Net exports
840
1,334
1,043
6,514
5,942
6,035
2,459
2,330
2,190
 Usage
9,260
9,702
9,367
7,094
6,937
7,205
6,009
6,225
6,238
   Carryout
1,399
1,195
1,059
310
331
371
341
336
338
 

USDA Export Sales (tmt) - Week of 30 October 2008

Country

Commodity

New Sales

Accum. Exports

 

Country

Commodity

New Sales

Accum. Exports

Canada

Soybeans

3.10

68.70

 

Jamaica

Soymeal

1.70

10.30

China

Soybeans

642.50

2598.60

 

Japan

Soymeal

1.10

4.80

Colombia

Soybeans

1.10

23.50

 

Lebanon

Soymeal

7.80

7.80

France

Soybeans

60.90

60.90

 

Mexico

Soymeal

18.20

157.90

Indonesia

Soybeans

10.60

199.80

 

Nicaragua

Soymeal

1.80

8.70

Israel

Soybeans

1.00

81.40

 

Panama

Soymeal

3.20

18.00

Japan

Soybeans

97.50

393.00

 

Philippines

Soymeal

40.40

8.10

Mexico

Soybeans

11.10

522.90

 

Salvador

Soymeal

1.20

8.10

Morocco

Soybeans

30.00

0.70

 

Saudi Arabia

Soymeal

14.80

2.00

Netherlands

Soybeans

65.30

65.30

 

Venezuela

Soymeal

2.00

37.20

Peru

Soybeans

5.50

5.50

 

Canada

Soyoil

0.40

3.30

Romania

Soybeans

25.40

25.40

 

Haiti

Soyoil

0.40

1.30

Spain

Soybeans

13.60

0.00

 

Japan

Soyoil

0.30

0.30

Syria

Soybeans

44.40

71.40

 

 

 

 

 

Taiwan

Soybeans

183.10

227.20

 

Export Sales Totals (tmt)

Thailand

Soybeans

4.50

69.60

 

Commodity

Outstanding Sales

Accum. Exports

New Sales

Turkey

Soybeans

2.20

67.30

 

Soybeans

10,002.90

5,139.70

894.60

Canada

Soymeal

5.40

90.80

 

Soymeal

1,932.60

517.30

107.40

Colombia

Soymeal

1.50

9.70

 

Soyoil

128.70

43.90

1.00


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