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November 8, 2011
 
Philippine Feed Weekly: Feed prices up after typhoon onslaught (week ended Oct 12, 2011)

An eFeedLink Exclusive
 

Price summary

Prices of feed in the Philippines went up days after strong typhoons Pedring (international name Nesat) and Quiel (Nalgae) have devastated the country.

According to traders, the increase was attributed to hike in feed prices in the global market.

Analysts believe that prices of feed will continue to increase as the demand during Christmas season is at its peak.
 
 
Market Analysis
 
The cyclones that hit Southeast Asian countries such as Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam have devastated farmlands, which further affected prices of feed grains.

An estimated total of 2.5 million hectares of crop lands in these nations were heavily damaged by typhoons.

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation, loss of crops, livestock and poultry are significant and are considered at risk.

For this reason, tight supplies are seen which could push prices of local feeds in the coming weeks. Domestic livestock and feed producers are already thinking of importation to avert possible supply woes in the coming months.
 

Prices of raw feed ingredients (in PHP/kg)

 

October 6

October 12

Changes

Yellow corn

13.90

15.25

+1.35

Rice Bran

13.80

11.00

-2.80

Copra meal

11.00

12.10

+1.10

Pollard 

13.80

13.50

-0.30

Feed wheat

13.80

15.50

+1.70

Coconut oil 

62.00

64.00

+2.00

US soymeal

23.50

22.50

-1.00

Argentina soymeal

23.50

21.50

-2.00

Molasses

6.50

6.50

0.00

Fishmeal

44.00

45.00

+1.00

Note: Prices are quoted from the Bureau of Animal Industry
US$1 = PHP43.08 (November 8, 2011)

 


 
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