September 16, 2003

 

 

Mexico Cancels Ban On Imports Of US Poultry
 

Mexico has announced the cancellation of the ban on all imports of U.S. poultry products from Utah, Idaho, Oregon, Colorado and New Mexico due to an Exotic Newcastle Disease outbreak, according to information from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign Agricultural Service web site, dated Sept. 10 and released Monday.

 

Livestock, Rural Development, Fishery and Food (SAGARPA) published in the Mexican Diario Oficial (Federal Register) on Sept. 9, 2003 the cancellation of the announcement that banned all imports of U.S. poultry products from Utah, Idaho, Oregon, Colorado and New Mexico due to an Exotic Newcastle Disease outbreak. The announcement indicates that the epidemiological activities to control the Exotic Newcastle Disease outbreak, carried out by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS/USDA), were successful. Consequently, the absence of the Newcastle virus and incidences of this illness in the states of Utah, Idaho, Oregon, Colorado and New Mexico was determined and verified in situ by Mexican officials from Jan. 26 through Feb. 1, 2003.

 

On January 10, 2003, Mexico's Secretariat of Agriculture (SAGARPA) announced that it had banned all imports of U.S. poultry products (except for cooked meat) because of an outbreak of Newcastle Disease in California, but would allow shipments to enter through Jan. 17, 2003. On January 14, 2003, USDA sent a technical team from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to Mexico to try and address SAGARPA¡¯s concerns and explain USDA's Newcastle control procedures. After nearly 20 hours of meetings over four days, SAGARPA agreed to temporarily regionalize the ban. Therefore, as a temporary measure, and until the risk analysis to evaluate the situation in the U.S. was completed, poultry would be allowed to enter only under certain terms.