March 4, 2016

 

Monsanto's DEKALB® Disease Shield offers protection against corn diseases

 

 

 

Every year, corn farmers face the risk of costly plant diseases that can significantly reduce yields and profitability, according to Monsanto.

 

To help combat this issue, DEKALB® brand is introducing an advanced new lineup - using predictive analytics and state-of-the-art technology like genome wide selection -- called DEKALB® Disease Shield™.

 

These products will be available for the 2017 growing season and will be the latest solution on the market to help farmers maximise yield through industry-leading protection against major corn diseases.

 

Rebecca Waller, DEKALB's brand manager, said DEKALB Disease Shield features an exclusive combination of genetics with enhanced disease protection developed by the brand's breeding programme. These new products, she added, provide a broad spectrum of protection against the most common, yield-robbing corn diseases today, including anthracnose stalk rot, gray leaf spot, Goss's wilt, northern corn leaf blight and, in some areas, southern rust.

 

"Farmers typically experience these diseases every one or two seasons out of every five, but in any given season, they never know whether their fields will be at risk," Waller noted. "With DEKALB Disease Shield, farmers can grow more confidently, maximising the potential of their top-yielding DEKALB products on every acre, from field to field."

 

According to Waller, these products also improve plant health, standability and harvestability.

 

"DEKALB Disease Shield products have shown strong performance in trials and demonstrated an advantage over competitor products," she said. "On-farm trials are planned for the 2016 season to give farmers the opportunity to experience the comprehensive disease protection first-hand and to provide feedback to help us make future commercialisation decisions."

 

The DEKALB Disease Shield lineup will be available for purchase this fall for planting in 2017.

Video >

Follow Us

FacebookTwitterLinkedIn