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China


November 18, 2019

 

China's Agriculture Ministry calls for regions to boost swine breeding for Chinese New Year
 

 

Han Changfu, China's Agricultural Minister told officials from nine regional governments to increase swine numbers with support from the government, reported Reuters.

 

According to a notice published on China's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs on November 17, 2019, the minister said the country needs to recover its swine production in order to stabilise pork prices.

 

The central government will aid swine farmers with the assistance of local governments, especially as Chinese New Year falls on end January 2020.

 

Some of the measures implemented include financial assistance and providing more land to raise swine. However, zoning restrictions on swine farms must be strictly enforced and cannot be expanded beyond its original remit.

 

These incentives for swine farmers looking to increase their herd come as the country is fearful of the political implications of a pork shortage, its most popular consumed meat.

 

The government has also supported bigger productions of poultry and other meat products to compensate for the shortfall in swine supplies.

 

The China Daily, citing ministry data, reported wholesale swine prices in China are currently at 48 RMB (US$6.86) per kg on November 15, 2019. Prices have dropped compared to the start of November, but it is still higher than 2018 prices by 157%.

 

It is estimated that only half of China' swine population remain following the African swine fever (ASF) outbreak that has spread throughout the country.

 

Hu Chunhua, China's Vice Premier said swine has a role that cannot be replaced with regard to maintaining economic and political stability in the country.

 

-  Reuters

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