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Market Reports

November 14, 2015
 
Swine and ruminant diseases reported across Europe (Global Animal Disease Update) (week ended Nov 13, 2015)
 
An eFeedLink Exclusive
 
 
Swine and ruminant diseases were reported across Europe this week. The following report provides an overview of the overall disease situation.
 

EUROPE

1.  First occurrence of lumpy skin disease virus detected in Greece

A first occurrence of lumpy skin disease virus was detected in Greece, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) reports.

The information was received by the OIE on November 9 from Mr. Spiros Doudounakis, Director, Animal Health Directorate, Directorate General of Veterinary Services / Animal Health Directorare, Ministry of Rural Development and Food, Athens, Greece.

The outbreak event was reported to have started on August 20, with outbreaks occurring in Anatoliki Makedonia Kai Thraki and Kentriki Makedonia. 57 cases were identified in cattle, resulting in 552 cattle becoming susceptible and nine infected cattle dying. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included movement control inside the country, disinfection, traceability, quarantine, surveillance outside containment and protect zones, official disposal of carcasses, by-products and waste, zoning and control of vectors. No vaccination and treatment were given to the affected animals.
  
2.  Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus detected in France

Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus, serotype 8, was detected in France, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on November 9 from Dr. Loic Evain, Directeur Général adjoint, CVO, Direction générale de l'alimentation, Ministère de l'Agriculture, de l'Agroalimentaire et de la Forêt, Paris, France.

The outbreak was reported to have started on September 11 in Loire, Correze, Cantal, Allier and Puy-de-dome. 12 cases were identified in cattle, resulting in 1,721 cattle becoming susceptible. The source of the outbreak was unknown.

Control measures included movement control inside the country, screening, vaccination in response to the outbreak, disinfection, traceability, surveillance outside containment and protection zones, surveillance inside containment and protection zones, zoning, and control of vectors. No treatment was given to the affected animals.
 
3.  First occurrence of African swine fever virus detected in Latvia

A first occurrence of African swine fever virus was detected in Latvia, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on November 10 from Dr. Maris Balodis, Chief Veterinary Officer & Director General, Food and Veterinary Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Riga, Latvia.

The outbreak event was reported to have started on June 26, 2014, with outbreaks occurring in Zilupes county, Rezeknes county, Gulbenes county, Smiltenes county, Apes county, Madonas county, Lubanas county, Ilukstes county, Balkas county, Balvu county and Aizkraukles parish. 22 cases were identified in wild boars and 13 infected wild boars died. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included movement control inside the country, screening, disinfection, quarantine, control of wildlife reservoirs and zoning. No vaccination and treatment were given to the affected animals.
      
4.  Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus detected in Hungary

Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus, of an as yet unidentified serotype, was detected in Hungary, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on September 22 from Dr. Lajos Bognár, Deputy State Secretary Chief Veterinary Officer, Food Chain Safety Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Budapest, Hungary.

The outbreaks were reported to have started on September 21 in Szedres, Tolna and Liptód, Baranya. Three cases were identified in cattle, resulting in 948 becoming susceptible. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included movement control inside the country, screening, vaccination and control of vectors. No treatment was given to the affected animals.
 


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