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November 8, 2019

 

US FDA proposes prescription requirement for livestock antibiotics

 


The proposed law by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) restricts livestock antibiotics through veterinary clinics by end 2020, reported NBC Kris-6 News and the American Veterinary Medical Association.

 

Similar restrictions have been applied to drugs administered through feed or water, but producers are still able to obtain injectable drugs and antimicrobial products over the counter or online.

 

Once the proposed law has been passed, there will be a two-year phase in before it is completely implemented by end 2023.

 

Dr. Joe Paschal, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Beef Cattle Specialist said this new law would mean that producers will need to develop a relationship with a livestock veterinarian, allowing the latter to diagnose illnesses and use a microbial to treat livestock's illnesses or diseases.

 

He added that this new practice will increase biosecurity, diagnose illnesses accurately, decrease diseases incidents, boost livestock productivity and most importantly, reduce the use of antibiotics in livestock, pets and humans.

 

Through this law, the US FDA can regulate and ensure veterinary oversight of all antibiotics in livestock, at the same time keeping the public safe.

 

Antibiotics are medically important to both humans and livestock, and it is important to extend its useful lifespan, Dr. Paschal said. While there has never been any mix-up of antibiotics between livestock and humans, he said this new law will completely prevent any possible crossover from happening.

 

A new research into how long antimicrobials can be administered to cattle will be funded by the US FDA to Kansas State University. The US$500,000 research will involve two antimicrobials: tylosin phosphate to prevent liver abscesses in feedlots and chlortetracycline for treatment of bovine anaplasmosis.

 

-      NBC Kris 6 News and the American Veterinary Medical Association

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