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September 22, 2016
 
Chinese interest lifts Vietnam hog prices 
 
An eFeedLink Exclusive
    
   
Price summary

In August, hog prices were mostly up slightly.
 

Procurement price of live hog over 80kg (Expressed in VND 1,000/kg)

 

W1

W2

W3

W4

Dong Nai

44000

44000

48000

46000

Binh Duong

43000

45000

44500

45000

Can Tho

41500

42000

42000

42000

HCM

45000

46000

46500

46500

Hanoi

45000

44500

44000

45000

(VND1,000 = US$0.045 as of August)

  
 
Market analysis
 
According to recent local reports, traders were seeking sales of large hog sizes. However, prices are not fluctuating as strongly as the peak seen last March and April, which ranged between VND43,000-VND47,000 (US$1.92-US$2.10) per kilogram.
 
In the Mekong Delta provinces, in Can Tho city, the purchase price of live hog had increased by VND500 (US$0.02) per kilogram from the start of August, reaching VND42,000 (US$1.88) per kilogram. In Dong Nai province, the price ranged between VND44,000-VND46,000 (US$1.97-US$2.06) per kilogram, up VND2,000 (US$0.09) per kilogram compared to the first two weeks of the month, as traders began buying large hogs (about 120kg per head) to export to China.
 
However, farmers are not too optimistic about the sudden rise in demand. They say that demand has changed too erratically with domestic consumption remaining low. Moreover, just two months ago, feed prices had shot up four to five times.
 
As estimated, the total herd size in the country in August grew 3.5-4% year-on-year.
 
 
Market forecast
 
The minister of livestock department said farmers remained profitable and continued to sustain production without significant price changes. However, farmers should learn from their previous mistake, by making production decisions based on sound market observation and judgment. In particular, farmers should not stock up too much to anticipate Chinese demand, because if prices were to fall suddenly, they would incur huge losses.
 


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