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Industry Happenings


September 19, 2018


Phileo launches yeast extract for aquaculture

 

 


Phileo announces the launch of Prosaf®, a solution to better value plant-based diets by increasing feed intake and performance.


Prosaf is a water-soluble purified yeast extract, obtained by primary fermentation with a high protein content.


"Working at the crossroads of nutrition and health, we are committed to delivering innovative solutions that enhance farmed fish and shrimp health and performance," said Otavio Castro, Global Species Manager Aquaculture at Phileo. "This is the context in which we're delighted to unveil Prosaf, a truly innovative product that will bring new flexibility to balancing aquaculture diets for optimal performance."


The use of marine ingredients, such as fishmeal and fish oil, is being drastically reduced in aquafeed production due to the decreasing availability of such items worldwide. While manufacturers are turning instead to more sustainable items, such as plant-based ingredients, their inclusion remains challenging, especially at high levels. This is due to negative impacts on feed intake, perturbations of metabolic and health status, and growth performance slowdown.


This is why Phileo R&D has developed Prosaf, a highly palatable source of small-sized bioavailable peptides, free amino acids and nucleotides, designed to boost fish growth, performance and disease resistance.

 
Officially analysed by HPLC, Prosaf has been confirmed as containing only small peptides, more than 88% of which are below 3.6 kDa, with 38% below 1 kDa. As such, the product offers highly bioavailable nutrients to increase the palatability and digestibility of plant-based diets.

 
Pre-launch studies, based on shrimp, have proved that supplementing low-fishmeal diets with Prosaf results in the same feed intake, growth performance and restored immune status, as comparative diets with three times as much fishmeal content.


Trial One, carried out in Brazil earlier this year, demonstrated that reducing the fishmeal content of shrimp diets from 12 to 3% significantly reduced feed consumption. However, when the same low-fishmeal diet was supplemented with 2% Prosaf, over a feeding period of 15 days, there was a significant increase in feed intake.


Trial Two, carried out with shrimp diets at Prince of Songkla University in Thailand, also earlier this year, demonstrated that supplementing a low-fishmeal diet (5%) with 2.5% Prosaf improved weight gain significantly. The trial also showed that low-fishmeal diets, supplemented with Prosaf at 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5% respectively, delivered weight gain results which were as efficient as those recorded for a high-fishmeal diet (15%). The same trial also included an assessment of the impact of Prosaf on both low and high-fishmeal diets. When recorded after 62 days of feeding, the specific growth rate of shrimp in a low-fishmeal control group (5%) was lower than the high-fishmeal control group (15%). This negative effect was mitigated, however, by supplementing the low-fishmeal diet with Prosaf at 2.5%, increasing the specific growth rate of the Prosaf group by up to 18 points.


There is also trial evidence that Prosaf strengthens the natural defences of shrimp in comparison to fish which are fed on a non-supplemented low-fishmeal diet. This is based on the importance of haemocytes, as a vital component of the shrimp haemolymph, due to their ability to differentiate and play several immune defence roles, such as phagocytosis, encapsulation, prophenol oxidase system and melanisation. According to the trial carried out at Prince of Songkla University, supplementing a low-fishmeal diet (5%) with 2.5% Prosaf for 62 days significantly increased the total haemocyte count in whiteleg shrimp hemolymph. It was also observed that phenoloxidase activity was significantly improved in shrimp fed a low-fishmeal diet which was supplemented with Prosaf (2.5%), compared to the low-fishmeal diet control group (5%).

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