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Americas


September 19, 2018

 

Canadian pork producers in 'difficult financial position', asks for gov't support

 
 

Canadian pigs are being sold at prices 30% lower than last year.

 

This is because of the current uncertainty in global pork markets resulting from trade disputes, according to the Canadian Pork Council (CPC).

 

"Canadian farmers are in an extraordinarily difficult financial position", the CPC said in a press release.

 

The CPC said that since Canadian pork producers are integrated into the much larger US market, the prices they receive are based directly on those negotiated by their American counterparts.

 

"Unfortunately, the fallout from trade disputes between the United States and key pork markets such as China, Mexico and Canada have intensified the normal seasonal decline in prices", the CPC stated.

 

'Gov't support needed'

 

The CPC said Canadian farmers need support from its federal and provincial governments similar to the US government's $12-billion trade mitigation package that includes a series of pork-specific initiatives that include an $8-per-hog ad hoc payment.

 

"While we can compete and succeed in normal market conditions, we need immediate, short-term support to help weather this storm" said the CPC, which touts itself as "the national voice for hog producers in Canada".

 

Manitoba producer and CPC chair Rick Bergmann claimed that "the financial stress on individual producers is increasing rapidly".

 

"We need to act and act quickly. I look forward to meeting with (Agriculture) Minister (Lawrence) MacAulay to discuss the situation as soon as possible", he added.

 

Canada is the third-largest supplier of pork to global markets. Around 70% of the country's production, valued at C$4 billion, is sold to consumers around the world.

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