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September 4, 2019

 

All localities in Vietnam now confirmed hit by African swine fever

 

 

All localities in Vietnam have now been struck by African swine fever, with Ninh Thuan Province, the last Vietnamese locality to confirm an outbreak, VnExpress International reported.


The disease was discovered at Ninh Son District, the central province's sub-department of livestock production and animal health announced on August 31.

 

Following the deaths of 354 pigs at a farm, test showed that they were infected with ASF. Veterinary officials said all the infected pigs have been culled, along with measures implemented to mitigate the spread of the disease.

 

Areas near the location of the outbreak have been sanitised while checkpoints would be established to stop delivery of more infected pigs, they said.

 

Vietnam was first impacted by ASF in early February. The disease spread rapidly across the country's northern and central regions before reaching the south in early May.

 

About 13% of Vietnam's pig stock - or four million pigs, were culled so far, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.

 

Pork makes up three-quarters of total meat consumption in Vietnam, where most of its farm-raised pigs are consumed domestically. The country's pork industry is valued at VND94 trillion (US$4 billion), and accounts for nearly 10% of its agricultural sector.

 

As of August 29, data from the World Organization for Animal Health shows that 19 countries and territories have notified new or ongoing outbreaks. The countries include Belgium, Bulgaria, Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia and Ukraine in Europe; China, North Korea, Laos, Myanmar, Russia, and Vietnam in Asia; and Africa's Zimbabwe and South Africa.

 

- VnExpress International

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