Poultry
xClose

Loading ...
Swine
xClose

Loading ...
Dairy & Ruminant
xClose

Loading ...
Aquaculture
xClose

Loading ...
Feed
xClose

Loading ...
Animal Health
xClose

Loading ...
World


August 19, 2019

 

Vietnam's farms, enterprises turn to poultry as swine fever outbreak continues

 

 

Vietnam's African swine fever outbreaks have caused local enterprises and farms to switch to poultry farming and thus provide an alternate source of meat.

 

Based on data provided by Vietnam's Department of Livestock Production under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, total poultry flocks across the country had increased by 7.5% in the first six months of 2019. Poultry egg production was close to reaching seven billion eggs, up 11.4%.

 

Nguyen Xuan Duong, acting director of the Department of Livestock Production, commented that the best ratio for several countries is pigs accounting for around 40%, with poultry making up for 40%. The rest of the percentage would be other animal husbandry products.

 

However, in Vietnam, pigs account for up to 70% of meat production while poultry holds around 20%. Cattle takes about 7% and the rest include other types of fish.

 

As such, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development has a policy to raise the ratio of poultry and cattle in the structure of meats but only by around 7% for poultry and 5% for beef. If the ratio of poultry increases significantly, it may lead to overproduction.

 

Another challenge for local farmers is the import of very low priced chicken from the US.

 

Report from the General Department of Vietnam Customs stated that, in the first half of this year, enterprises had imported 62,400 tonnes of chicken from the US with a total import turnover of US$48.6 million.

 

In addition, the average price of chicken imported from the country was merely below VND18,000 (US$0.77) per kilogramme. It is also forecast that import volume might increase in the final months of 2019 if US farm produce still face difficulties in consumption.

 

- SGGP

Share this article on FacebookShare this article on TwitterPrint this articleForward this article
Previous
My eFeedLink last read