Poultry
xClose

Loading ...
Swine
xClose

Loading ...
Dairy & Ruminant
xClose

Loading ...
Aquaculture
xClose

Loading ...
Feed
xClose

Loading ...
Animal Health
xClose

Loading ...
Undefined
 
June 9, 2016

     

24th IPVS explores key topics on swine viral diseases, reproduction and public health

 

An eFeedLink Exclusive

 

On the second day of the 24th International Pig Veterinary Society (IPVS) Congress held in Dublin, Ireland, key topics on viral diseases, reproduction and public health were discussed by experts from industry and academia.

 

On the topic of viral diseases, keynote speaker Professor Fernando Osorio of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln duly recognised that Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) is the most economically significant infectious disease of swine worldwide, and his presentation "What is next in PRRS vaccination? - Pursuit of broad heterologous protection" set the tone for the subsequent presentations.

 

Among other things, Professor Osorio suggested that bio-informatics analysis of PRRS virus genomes may provide the clue for broadening the antigenic coverage of PRRS vaccines and immunogens, and that the synthetic PRRSV-CON virus can serve as the parental strain for the development of a novel PRRS live vaccine with broader cross-protection.

 

He was followed by the other keynote speaker on viral diseases, Professor Gerald Reiner of the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, who in his presentation "Genetic resistance - an alternative in controlling PRRS?", recognised that the detection and knockout of CD163 as the receptor responsible for PRRS virus replication in swine is a milestone in swine production. However, he also brought up potential regulatory and societal concerns regarding the use gene editing in commercial swine production.

 

Such discussions by Professor Osorio and Reiner were later similarly shared by Professor John Harding of the University of Saskatchewan, an invited speaker to a symposium by Boehringer Ingelheim. He spoke on 'vaccinomics' and concluded that the industry is moving towards an era of personalised and predictive vaccinomics instead of a one-size-fits-all approach.
 
Share this article on FacebookShare this article on TwitterPrint this articleForward this article
Previous
My eFeedLink last read