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Industry Happenings


May 18, 2017

 

Perstorp introduces new esterified organic acid for feed

 

 


The Perstorp Group has officially introduced ProPhorce™ Valerins to the market.


ProPhorce Valerins are glycerol esters of valeric acid to be used in feed to promote animal performance.


The last introduction of a new organic acid to be used in feed was decades ago. Valeric acid has never before been tested for commercial production which makes the introduction of ProPhorce™ Valerins one of kind, says Perstorp.

 

In vitro and in vivo trials with ProPhorce Valerins show promising results in reducing the negative impact of Clostridium perfringens.


Perstorp is a producer of both the product ProPhorce Valerins and the main raw materials glycerol and valeric acid. Today there are only two producers of valeric acid in the world.


Research into short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) has been conducted by specialists in Perstorp's innovation laboratories together with the Universities of Ghent and Lund and the Southern Poultry Research Group in Athens, US. The research conducted included an extensive screening of all the SCFAs available. ProPhorce Valerins showed 'remarkable' results especially in broiler diets in the presence of a Clostridium perfringens challenge.


The world's poultry specialists got a first sneak peak of ProPhorce Valerins and what value it can bring, when Perstorp introduced its new product at the European Symposium of Poultry Nutrition (ESPN) on May 8 for the first time.
 

"The market is eager to hear and learn about the first new organic acid to be introduced in decades, and how it can help to further improve animal gut health and performance," says Geert Wielsma, Portfolio Director Gut Health for Perstorp's business unit Feed & Food. "There is still much to be learned about gut health or even the effects that organic acids and especially valeric acid can have on it. We are committed to continue developing the available knowledge in this field and to keep on improving animal performance," Wielsma continues.

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