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Industry Happenings


April 16, 2018

 

CJ holds animal nutrition forum in Vietnam

 

 

 

CJ CheilJedang Bio held an Animal Nutrition Forum in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, on March 15, 2018.

 

More than 80 animal feed nutrition experts from Asia attended the event, where several practicing professionals from Asia and CJ Headquarter presented a variety of topics. The forum covered new trends on proper protein use in animal feeds, protein reduction, removal of anti-nutritional factors from soymeal, and the physiological and functional benefits of amino acids.

 

The first speaker of this forum, Dr. Seksom, a well-known professor from Kasetsart University in Thailand, emphasised that the availability and prices of individual raw materials can influence the amino acid contribution in animal feed formulations. Southeast Asian countries have the advantage of being able to easily acquire diverse feed raw materials that are more cost competitive than other regions. However, information on the amino acid profiles of these various ingredients are very limited such that they are not properly applied in the feed formulation or are either over- or underestimated. Therefore, the amino acid profile must be continuously updated for each raw material, before additional cost savings of feed could be achieved.

 

In addition, Dr. Seksom shared the trial results of his two experiments on L-methionine and L-Arginine application. For the broiler experiment, L-methionine showed higher efficiency than DL-methionine with a conclusion that DL-methionine can be replaced by 85% of L-methionine without compromising the growth performance and carcass quality of broiler chickens. While for the L-Arginine trial, the growth performance of broilers were maximised when fed with diets containing 126% arginine to lysine (Arg:Lys) ratio.

 

 

Dr. Seksom's presentation was followed by that of Dr. Clina Guo, the technical and marketing manager of CJ China, who presented the functional benefits of valine in swine and poultry. Dr. Guo highlighted that the positive effects of valine in animals were so significant, which resulted in an increase in the number of Chinese animal feed companies using valine considerably.

 

Valine is metabolised through a unique pathway. It is first metabolised in the muscle, unlike other amino acids that are metabolised in the liver, giving a positive effect in enhancing muscle development in animals. In addition, she emphasised that valine supplementation in the diets can improve FCR and increase body weight of piglets and broilers. Also, valine supplementation can reduce backfat loss and improve milk quality and yield of lactating sows. Dr. Guo recommended an optimal ratio of valine to lysine (Val:Lys) in each phase of animal: 70% in piglets, 105 to 110% in sows, 78 to 80% in broilers and 90% in laying poultry.

 

 

Dr. Thieu, a professor from Nonglam University, Vietnam, then presented the topic "Utilization of Fermented Soybean Meal for Piglets and Poultry Nutrition".

 

Since the use of antibiotics as growth enhancer in animal feeds are already prohibited in several countries due to issues on resistance and animal welfare, researchers are probing other means to replace the antibiotics with different types of feed additives such as probiotics, acidifiers, essential oils, and enzymes. Dr. Thieu presented research evaluating CJ Soytide, a fermented soymeal product with the advantage of high peptide content and probiotics, produced by CJ CheilJedang Bio, as a potential antibiotic replacement alternative in piglet and poultry feed. The result of actual feeding trials showed that Soytide was able to successfully replace antibiotics in animal diets, based on the observed improvements in growth performance, feed efficiency and intestinal morphology. Dr. Thieu concluded that CJ Soytide is a suitable protein source and a functional protein that could replace antibiotics in animal feeds.

 

 

The last speaker, Dr. Peter Hong, technical marketing manager of CJ Korea, shared the latest trends in reducing crude protein (CP) in animal diets. Dr. Hong shared that there are several issues arising from the role of dietary protein in animals. Recently, there is increased need to consider the harmful effects of excess CP on animal health and on the global environment. If the diets contain high levels of CP, animals have to consume more water to remove excess nitrogen from the CP digested by the body, thus, the need to produce more urine. When the amount of urine is increased, the metabolic energy will be decreased as well since urinary energy will be increased. Dr. Hong also shared various evidence that there is no significant negative effect of dietary CP reduction on animal performance.
 
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