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March 2, 2019

 

African swine fever epidemic in China shows 'downward trend', OIE says

 

 

China has made big strides in trying to eradicate African swine fever, which has affected at least 24 provinces since August last year, according to the head of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Dr. Monique Eloit.

 

Eloit visited China last month to assess the measures being applied to prevent and control the ASF (http://www.efeedlink.com/search/?q=ASF).

 

The OIE director-general told reporters that she 'highly" recognized the prevention and control measures taken by China when asked to evaluate China's efforts in ASF prevention and control.

 

"As time goes by, we can see that a great number of major measures to control the epidemic have been adopted, including restricting the transportation of live hogs and prohibiting the feeding of kitchen wastes with the quality of prevention and control being constantly improved. I am very confident that China can do a better job of controlling the epidemic", she said.

 

Eloit admitted that the most difficult issue on global ASF prevention and control is that effective vaccine has not yet been developed. "As a result", she said, "we must implement strict bio-security measures in order to prevent cases caused by illegal smuggling and goods carried by tourists".

 

She noted that the epidemic in China "has shown a downward trend, and the assessment is relatively optimistic".

 

According to the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs (MARA), 77 affected areas in 21 provinces have so far been lifted out of the blockade and stressed that the epidemic occurred in separate spots rather than spreading widely.  

 

It said the number of pigs culled as of January 14, 2019, has reached 916,000 in 24 provinces. --Rick Alberto

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