Poultry
xClose

Loading ...
Swine
xClose

Loading ...
Dairy & Ruminant
xClose

Loading ...
Aquaculture
xClose

Loading ...
Feed
xClose

Loading ...
Animal Health
xClose

Loading ...
Aquaculture


March 1, 2019

 

Irish government's aquaculture quality certification scheme granted int'l recognition

 

 


 

Fish-farm operations and other aquaculture-related ventures certified by Ireland's Seafood Development Agency, or BIM (Bord Iascaigh Mhara), are now officially recognised as hewing to the international standards of sustainability.

 

The Netherlands-based Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI) has given formal recognition to the BIM Certified Quality Aquaculture (CQA), indicating that BIM's Farm Standard is in alignment with all applicable essential components of the GSSI Global Benchmark Tool.

 

The Tool is underpinned by the FAO Technical Guidelines on Aquaculture Certification and consists of performance areas related to scheme governance, operational management (including chain of custody) and applied aquaculture farm audit standards.

 

The BIM's CQA scheme is the eighth seafood certification scheme and the fourth aquaculture certification to be benchmarked against GSSI's Global Benchmark Tool and to achieve recognition.

 

It is also the first government-run scheme to achieve recognition.

 

"This recognition shows that the BIM Certified Quality Aquaculture scheme and their Farm Standard is in line with the FAO's guidelines for aquaculture certification", said Herman Wisse, GSSI managing director. "With four fisheries and four aquaculture schemes now recognised by GSSI, the GSSI Benchmark Tool is truly providing global alignment in seafood certification."

 

Jim O'Toole, BIM's CEO, said the endorsement of their CQA scheme by the GSSI "marks an important step for Ireland's seafood sector and for the Irish aquaculture industry".

 

"GSSI recognition strengthens Ireland's reputation as a leading producer of sustainable seafood", he added.

Share this article on FacebookShare this article on TwitterPrint this articleForward this article
Previous
My eFeedLink last read