Poultry
xClose

Loading ...
Swine
xClose

Loading ...
Dairy & Ruminant
xClose

Loading ...
Aquaculture
xClose

Loading ...
Feed
xClose

Loading ...
Animal Health
xClose

Loading ...
Product Processing & Packaging


February 12, 2020

 

Pork prices in China reach near record highs after coronavirus restrictions

 


Restrictions on swine transport and start delays of slaughtering plants due to the coronavirus outbreak in China has pushed pork prices close to 2019 record levels, reported Reuters.

 

Zhao Yuelei, Cofeed analyst, an agriculture consultancy said purchasing swine has become difficultwith transportationrestrictions imposed across China.

 

Many provinces in China extended the Lunar New Year holidays for a week and placed movement restrictions due to the coronavirus outbreak.

 

He said stocks of live swineremained low in the market, resulting in higher pork prices.

 

According to data from Cofeed, pork prices hit 51.21 RMB (~US$7.34; 1 RMB = US$0.14) per kg on average on February 11, 2020, a slight increase from 48 RMB (~US$6.88) before the Lunar New Year and close to October 2019's 54 RMB (~US$7.75). This is different to previous years, where prices for pork usually drop after the Lunar New Year holidays.

 

A lockdown on many cities, as well as transport restrictions has made it difficult for swine to be transferred to slaughterhouses, with few staff available to operate the facilities.

 

Zhao said while agriculture and rural affairs ministry has called for food production to be country's priority, restrictions and disease prevention measures have stayed in place.

 

Bai Shanlin, C.P. Pokphand chief executive said several of its slaughterhouses have reopened. The company is one of China's top pork producers and slaughters 350,000 every month on average.

 

Bai said the company expects to boost production in 2020, adding that workers returning from coronavirus affected areas will be quarantined for two weeks before resuming work.

 

Problems related to logistics and labour issues have only made worse the domestic pork supply shortage in China, already decimated by the African swine fever outbreak.

 

XiongKuan, COFCO Futures analyst said China's pork consumption remains high and unaffected by the coronavirus outbreak.

 

However, Xiong said piglet and sow sales orders have been delayed by a month, or longer in other regions in China. This may impact pork supplies in the second half of 2020.

 

Xiong added that swine farm restocks have been slower than anticipated, with new farm constructions affected. Large sow herd losses have forced China's swine industry to use female swine, meant for meat to be used for breeding instead.

 

-      Reuters

Share this article on FacebookShare this article on TwitterPrint this articleForward this article
Previous
My eFeedLink last read