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February 8, 2018


'Friendly Salmon' is world's first raised on insect feed

 


The world's first ever salmon raised on insect-based proteins is here!


Dutch insect ingredient maker Protix announced this on Tuesday, describing the breakthrough as "major step towards aquaculture sustainability" or the Blue Shift.


"This is a proud moment for Protix and we call it the Blue Shift", said Protix CEO Kees Aarts.


"We started in 2009 with the idea to contribute to a sustainable food system and the Friendly Salmon presented today (Feb. 6) is a real example of that. Natural ingredients, no pressure on marine resources and healthy for the fish, the planet and ourselves", Aarts added.


The Friendly Salmon was developed in collaboration with the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) in Norway and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), among others.


Protix said the fishmeal made from wild-catch fish, which is believed to be non-sustainable, has been completely replaced by insect protein during the growth phases in fresh and salt water until they are ready to eat. "The fish grew well, and the health was great throughout the growth stages".


Protix CCO Tarique Arsiwalla said, "We're proud to have developed the quality insect ingredients required for a demanding and 'picky' fish species like the Atlantic salmon. We look forward to bringing this natural fish feed ingredient to our customers and partners".


The development of the insect-based salmon feed comes on the heels of the EU’s adoption of a regulation approving insect meal in aqua feed.


Protix last year acquired Fair Insects, a consortium of breeders that have a long history and experience in growing mealworm, cricket and locust. According to Protix, insect-based ingredients "are a giant leap towards a low-footprint future of our food system".  Rick Alberto

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