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January 11, 2013

 

Denmark's Skiold to build a large pig farm in Russia

 

 

Plans for the construction of a large pig farm in the Samara region of Russia was announced by Danish company Skiold.

 

According to a local newspaper, the total investment cost of the project will be equal to about RUB3.5 billion (US$110 million).

 

The company is currently discussing with the Ministry of Agriculture and Food of the Samara region the last details of the upcoming project. A platform for the investment may be the Syzran area where Skiold together with the municipal authorities are currently searching for suitable land.

 

District head, Vyacheslav Podobulin, said it was too early to talk about specific dates of the project implementation. Project supervisor of the company Skiold Vitaly Gorkovenko adds that the issue of land is not fully defined, and a place for the pig complex construction could be changed.

 

"We are considering the Syzran area, but if we are not satisfied with the proposed site, then we will look for another site. For example, closer to Samara," said Gorkovenko.

 

According to Gorkovenko, investors plan to build facilities for 100,000 animals of simultaneous keeping. Thus, it will be one of the largest pig projects in the Samara region. In the first phase Skiold will need 15 hectares of land, while after the construction the same size area will be required for seeding the feed crops.

 

The Government of the Samara region will organise the administrative and economic support for the new project. Danish holding Skiold is one of the leading producers of agricultural machines and machine tools in northern Europe. The company is engaged in the development, manufacture and sale of equipment for livestock and design and sale of feed mills. Another line of business is the pig farming.

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