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January 5, 2015
 
Reoccurrences of bird flu detected in Japan and Hong Kong (Global Animal Disease Update) (week ended Jan 2, 2015)
 
An eFeedLink Exclusive
 
 
Reoccurrences of bird flu have been detected in Japan and Hong Kong. The following report contains an update of the overall disease situation.
 

ASIA

1.  Reoccurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus detected in Japan

Reoccurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus, serotype H5N8, was detected in Japan, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) reports.

The information was received by the OIE on December 30, 2014 from Dr. Toshiro Kawashima, CVO, Animal Health Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Tokyo, Japan.

The outbreak was reported to be on November 3, 2014 at Miyazaki-shi, Takaoka-cho, Miyazaki and Nagato-shi, Yamaguchi. 47 cases were identified in birds, killing all infected birds and resulting in 79,047 birds become susceptible. 79,000 birds were destroyed. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included control of wildlife reservoirs, quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening and disinfection of infected premises. Vaccination is prohibited and no treatment was given to the affected animals.
  
2.  Reoccurrence of low pathogenic avian influenza virus detected in Hong Kong

Reoccurrence of low pathogenic avian influenza virus, serotype H7N9, was detected in Hong Kong, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on January 2, 2015 from Dr. Thomas Sit, Chief Veterinary Officer / Assistant Director (Inspection & Quarantine), Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government, Hong Kong.

The outbreak was reported to be on December 30, 2014 at 4 Hing Wah Street, Cheung Sha Wan. One case was identified in birds, resulting in 18,962 birds become susceptible. A total of 18,962 poultry, including 11,800 chickens, 3,140 silky chickens, 1,025 chukars and 2,997 pigeons were culled on December 31, 2014.The source of the outbreak was reported to be the legal movement of animals.

Control measures, among others, included quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening, zoning, and disinfection of infected premises. Vaccination is prohibited and no treatment was given to the affected animals. Importation of live poultry is banned for 21 days.
 

EUROPE

3.  Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus detected in Serbia

Reoccurrence of bluetongue virus was detected in Serbia, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on December 30, 2014 from Dr. Budimir, Head, Animal Health Department Veterinary Directorate, Ministry of Agriculture and Environmental Protection, Belgrade, Serbia.

The outbreak was reported to be on August 30, 2014 at Srbija. 342 cases were identified in sheep, 71 cases were identified in cattle and 12 cases were identified in goats, resulting in 3,362 sheep, 924 cattle and 200 goats become susceptible. 141 sheep, 18 cattle and one goat died. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included control of arthropods, quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening, zoning and modified stamping out. Vaccination is prohibited and no treatment was given to the affected animals.

4.  First occurrence of African swine fever virus detected in Latvia

First occurrence of African swine fever virus, was detected in Latvia, the OIE reports.

The information was received by the OIE on December 30, 2014 from Dr. Maris Balodis, Chief Veterinary Officer & Director General, Food and Veterinary Service, Ministry of Agriculture, Riga, Latvia.

The outbreak was reported to be on December 30 at Burtnieki county, Valka county and Kraslava county. 31 cases were identified in wild boar, killing all infected wild boars. The source of the outbreaks was unknown.

Control measures, among others, included control of wildlife reservoirs, stamping out, quarantine, movement control inside the country, screening, zoning and disinfection of infected premises. No vaccination or treatment were given to the affected animals.
 


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